Retailers, a missed opportunity for creating brand knowledge

Fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) marketers often miss the opportunity of educating retailers on their brands, specifically for new brands. Recall a moment in your life: when faced with a new brand in the shelf space, you might have often asked the retailer about what he/she thinks about the product, and how other customers might have reacted to this brand. We know deep inside our mind that retailers might not be knowledgeable enough to answer all our queries, however, we often assume that since he/she has been selling this for some time, the retailer might have “little more knowledge” than “no knowledge” of us. Finding this knowledge gap as an opportunity, a new brand must think otherwise.

How about pushing the knowledge bar a little higher by providing a mix of information that we want our retailers to convey to potential customers? How about we educate our retailers about the new brand so that he/she seems knowledgeable to potential customers? It can easily be done at a very low cost (as compared with advertising). Provide a handbill with a few minutes of in-store training on answering FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) about your new brand. May be a video disk (for more sophisticated retailers) would help, that they can watch at home on how the product is being made and how quality assurance has been taken care of. This would prepare them to answer queries of customers in actual store scenario. This might also act as a way of developing opinion leaders who could spread the word-of-mouth among customers.

After all, in this competitive age of brands talking out loud to reach customers’ ears, who would like to make an expensive waste by letting customers’ queries go unanswered?

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About 1mmarketing

Working as Associate Professor, School of Business, United International University, Bangladesh; a North-American graduate, with doctoral studies from UUM, Malaysia; cherishing a wide-view of the world, with multiple interests in culture, people, traveling, and specifically marketing science. I have a colorful and diversified background with a blend of corporate experience, research, consulting, training, public speaking and teaching. I love to write about marketing issues that affect our lives, and talk about its direction that would promote the greatest human welfare.
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5 Responses to Retailers, a missed opportunity for creating brand knowledge

  1. Nice thought, but aren’t the marketers of our country aware of this?

    • 1mmarketing says:

      I think they are aware, but not doing enough. Try it yourself. Drop in any retail store and find out a new brand, ask retailer how much he/she knows about the company, what ingredients there are, whether any precautions are there in usage etc., you will be surprised to see how little the company has kept the retailer informed about this.

  2. imran jahangir says:

    very nice thought..

  3. Abdullah Al Mahmud says:

    Its better then giving FMCG’s advertorials on newspaper. By that way a brand can go more closely to its consumer. But I think in Bangladesh it is tough to do that thing because retailer are not worry about the brands they are selling. They just want to sell the product to the customer. The company who gives them a good commission they just want to talk for them.

  4. Md. Waliul kabir Khan (PIAL) says:

    As i am reading the article and learn from it that retailers need to be considered to know and aware about brand knowledge actually what types of products they are selling. but my own point of view it is quiet difficult to practice and make awareness on brand of retailers who are selling the brand companies products through their own hand and by their word of mouth what they are practicing from the very beginning of the retail business. But ultimate problem is that the end user do not get enough information about the products.

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